What is the Kitten Vaccination Schedule?

All kittens need vaccinations to help keep them healthy. Vaccinations, by definition, protect your kitten from contracting specific diseases. Cat vaccinations are divided into two types:

  • Core cat vaccinations are those that protect against especially common and/or particularly dangerous diseases and are recommended for all kittens and adult cats.
  • Non-core vaccinations are not necessarily recommended for all cats. Instead, these vaccines are recommended only for those cats that are at high risk of infection. In the case of non-core vaccinations, your cat’s lifestyle must be evaluated to determine the risk of disease and whether the risk associated with vaccination is greater than the risk of your cat getting the disease.


Core Kitten Vaccinations

All kittens should receive a vaccination that protects against feline rhinotracheitis, feline calicivirus, and feline panleukopenia (FVRCP). These are all diseases that are ubiquitous in nature and frequently found in the general cat population.

Calicivirus is one of the most common viral causes of feline upper respiratory infections. Protection against all three of these viruses is generally provided in a combination vaccine.

Vaccinating Your Kitten

The vaccination schedule for FVRCP can begin as early as 6 weeks of age. Kittens are vaccinated once every three to four weeks until they reach 16 weeks of age or older.

However, to avoid over-vaccination, most veterinarians will recommend starting the vaccine at 8 weeks of age, followed by boosters at 12 weeks and 16 weeks old.

Rabies is the other core kitten vaccination. Rabies is a fatal disease that can affect not only cats but also many other animals, including humans. Your kitten can receive a rabies vaccination as early as 12 weeks of age, but this depends on state laws and the veterinarian.

Non-Core Kitten Vaccinations

Non-core kitten vaccinations include feline leukemia (FeLV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), Chlamydophila felis, and feline Giardia vaccines.

The FeLV vaccine is recommended by some veterinarians for all kittens, while others recommend the vaccine only for those kittens at risk of disease. The decision should be based on your pet’s lifestyle and a discussion with your vet.

Feline leukemia is a viral disease that can be transferred to kittens from their mother or through close contact with other infected cats. Kittens should be tested for FeLV prior to vaccination. Vaccination can begin at 8 to 12 weeks of age and requires a booster vaccine repeated three to four weeks later.

FIV vaccination is reserved for cats at high risk for disease. FIV is a viral disease that is most often spread from cat to cat via bite wounds. Vaccination for FIV produces a positive FIV test, which is indistinguishable from infection.

Vaccinating Your Kitten

Cats being vaccinated should receive an FIV test prior to vaccination. The vaccine is not 100 percent effective. Vaccination can begin at 8 weeks of age and should be bolstered at two- to three-week intervals for a total of three initial vaccines.

The Chlamydophila felis vaccine is only used in multi-cat environments where the infection is known to exist. Chlamydophila felis causes conjunctivitis and respiratory problems in infected cats. The vaccine can be administered at 9 weeks of age or older, when needed, and should be boostered three to four weeks later.

The FIP and Giardia vaccines are generally not recommended because of questionable efficacy and safety concerns. These vaccines are still being tested and are not widely used in the veterinary community.

Adult Cat Vaccination Schedule

Your cat will need boosters on the core vaccines one year following the initial kitten vaccines. After that booster, these vaccines are generally boostered every one to three years, based on the specific vaccine used and the lifestyle of the cat. Consult your veterinarian for advice about the proper vaccination schedule for your cat.

Non-core vaccines are boostered annually, but only for those cats at risk for the particular disease. Your veterinarian will help you determine the relative risks to your cat depending on your cat’s lifestyle, and will help you lay out an effective vaccination schedule based on your cat’s individual needs.

What You Need to Know about Kitten Vaccinations

Cost of Kitten and/or Cat Vaccinations

The cost of vaccinating your kitten can vary widely depending on your geographical location, the individual veterinary practice you visit, the type of vaccine, and many other factors.

Costs ranging from $20-$45 are not unusual for an individual vaccination alone, and most veterinarians will want to perform a physical examination before vaccinating your cat, which can add an additional $50-$100 to the total cost.

Your kitten may need to receive more than one vaccine during a visit as well. For instance, your kitten may need to receive a rabies vaccine along with the FVRCP vaccine.

Many practices offer packages that include multiple procedures for kittens. For instance, a new kitten might receive a physical examination, a first vaccination, a deworming, a test for feline leukemia, and a fecal examination all during the same visit.

Some veterinary hospitals offer a special price for these packaged services. Costs may range from $70-$250, or more if spay/neuter surgery or other services are included in the package.

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